Requiem by Lauren Oliver

Posted February 25, 2013 by Sara | Novel Novice 0 Comments

The highly-anticipated conclusion to Lauren Oliver’s Delirium Trilogy, Requiem sees the interweaving stories of Lena and former BFF Hana building to an explosive conclusion that will leave readers breathless.

requiemNow an active member of the resistance, Lena has been transformed. The nascent rebellion that was under way in Pandemonium has ignited into an all-out revolution in Requiem, and Lena is at the center of the fight.

After rescuing Julian from a death sentence, Lena and her friends fled to the Wilds. But the Wilds are no longer a safe haven—pockets of rebellion have opened throughout the country, and the government cannot deny the existence of Invalids. Regulators now infiltrate the borderlands to stamp out the rebels, and as Lena navigates the increasingly dangerous terrain, her best friend, Hana, lives a safe, loveless life in Portland as the fiancée of the young mayor.

Requiem is told from both Lena’s and Hana’s points of view. The two girls live side by side in a world that divides them until, at last, their stories converge.

Revolution. Resistance. Romance. These intertwining themes are the structure of Requiem, and Oliver deftly maneuvers her characters through a broken world on the brink of massive change. As always, Oliver’s writing is just lovely and she paints a world teetering between change for the better or for the much worse.

The pacing is swift and picks up even more momentum as the story builds towards its thrilling finale. However, the ending ultimately leaves a lot of loose threads and readers may not be satisfied by the resolution of Lena’s love triangle, which feels rushed and incomplete. Likewise, a lot of questions remain as to what will happen next — to both the world of the trilogy, and to its many characters. The primary story arc that began in Delirium comes full circle, but so much is left lingering and inconclusive.

Requiem is in stores on March 5th.

Sara | Novel Novice
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